pop-up wildlife

It's funny how things just evolve.  For example, take the library's little nature preserve, visible from the public computer area.  When the new library was built, nearly twelve years ago, that space was professionally landscaped with shrubs and trees.  After some time, a couple of the shrubs died and had to be removed.  The space was looking pretty bare, so library staff members purchased a couple of bird feeders to hang from the trees to attract birds in the winter.  Our children's librarian purchased a hummingbird feeder and started making monthly batches of hummingbird nectar in the break room.

After a few seasons, the lawn started to deteriorate and the grass gave way to clover, attracting rabbits.  The Friends of the Library bought a bird bath to place near the feeders.  Soon, the Pendleton Garden Club took interest in the area and obtained a grant to introduce native plants to the library's landscape. Now there is a pollinator garden that includes plants like Cardinal Flowers, Golden Alexanders, and Wild Bee Balm. Scott Andersen, from Seedy Sally's, took note of this charming little outdoor space, and donated a lovely new bird feeder that looks like a birch tree.  Before we knew it, what started out as basic, run-of-the-mill commercial landscaping became a nice, little wildlife refuge where you can spot birds of all kinds, rabbits, stray cats, and even the occasional fox. 

It wasn't our intention to create this space.  It just kinda happened.  The bunnies hopped over, and the birds settled in.  Staff gave the rabbits and squirrels names like Sweet Pea and Mayor McSquirrel.  They live in the microcosm of local flora and fauna that we can all enjoy, year-round.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Pendleton Community Garden

May 1, 2018


It's hard to believe that the Pendleton Community Garden is entering its 9th year.  Over that period of time, the garden has donated literally thousands of pounds of fresh, locally-grown produce to local residents.  Every Thursday during the growing season, fresh vegetables are harvested and loaded onto the library's Read 'n' Feed trailer, a unique combination of a bookmobile and mobile food pantry.

It's no secret that we love fresh veggies, but we also love fresh faces, and we want to involve as many people as we can in the community garden. It is a community garden after all.  And part of its mission is to "cultivate a community mindset of volunteerism." A great way to give back to your community is to get involved as a plotholder or garden volunteer.

If you are interested in becoming a plotholder, call the library at (765) 778-7527 to talk with Jennifer. She will explain that one half of each plot is for the plotholders who can grow veggies for themselves.  The other half of the plot is planted by volunteers, and that half grows vegetables for Read 'n' Feed.  Both halves of the plot are tended to by the plotholders.  This includes weeding, watering, and harvesting.  Jennifer can answer any question you may have about the Pendleton Community Garden, including how to become a garden volunteer.

Whether you want to spend an hour planting seeds in the sunshine or dedicate an afternoon each week to harvest, plant, or weed, the Pendleton Community Garden appreciates any and all help.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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