It's Good Work.

Over the past two weeks, I was scheduled to cover some shifts at the front desk.  Granted, I am often seen at the front desk, and I am well familiar with how to register patrons for library cards and get their materials checked out to them.  I know how to send faxes and help people with the printer.  I was doing it all, and feeling pretty competent in my front desk duties.

But, my feeling of competence quickly dissipated when I realized that I don't have any good suggestions for chapter books for 2nd grade readers.  I have no idea how to look up who lived in your house before you did.  And, I'm totally clueless when it comes to Android.  Luckily, there are other library staff members who are great at all of these things!

My time at the front desk made me realize how nimble public library staff has to be.  When we answer the phone or see a patron approach the desk, we really have no idea what comes next.  Perhaps a young patron just wants to hand us a drawing of a red turtle.  Maybe somebody needs help formatting a resume.  Or somebody wants a recommendation for a scary movie. Library staff is constantly shifting from one role to another to serve our patrons in the best way we can. 

When I got home after working the front desk, I felt a sense of accomplishment.  I felt like I actually made a difference.  Because you see, at the library we make people smile, every day.  We provide a sense of relief for patrons, every day.  We teach patrons a new skill, every day.  And, at the end of every day, library work is good work. 

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Virtual Reality Is So Real, It's Scary.

Recently we added virtual reality glasses to our Library of Things. I've always wanted to try them, and so I did. I started out riding a virtual roller coaster. I haven't been on a roller coaster for a few years, but I love them. So I thought I'd give that a shot. Well, after about 45 seconds, I had to take the glasses off because I started to feel nauseated. I never even got to the top of the hill!

My staff then recommended that I try the Jurassic Park experience, so I got that all cued up. They assured me that it wasn't scary, but I was scared anyway. Although I was just going for a peaceful walk in Jurassic Park, if there is such a thing, I was certain something was going to jump out and eat me alive. And even when a gentle Triceratops sauntered up next to me to join me on my walk, I was terrified. So, I had to stop that one too.

Finally, my staff recommended Google maps. You can type in any address and get a full 365 degree view of that location. I "traveled" to Red Square in Moscow before cuing up my home town of Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Within a minute, I felt like I was really there, standing outside my hometown McDonald's, just a short walk from the library where I got my start.

The upshot is that virtual reality is pretty cool once you find the experience that's right for you. I don't quite have the stomach for all of it. But, maybe you do. Stop by the library and give it a try.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Quackerjack Mini-Series

Sometimes I think the annual lucky duck race, and all that goes into it, has the makings of a good mini-series.  The story begins with the setting, as we zoom in on a creek running through a small town in Indiana.  A town that celebrates fireworks on the 4th of July and Lemon Shake-Ups at the Heritage Fair, it is a picture-perfect snapshot of Americana.

The cast includes a fun group of characters who are planning one of the hottest events of the year, the Friends of the Library's Annual Lucky Duck Race!  The show stars Friends' President, Coco Bill, who leads her volunteers with the motto "If you aren't having fun, you aren't doing it right." Also starring is George Gasparovic who reprises his role as The Judge by driving around town with a giant rubber duck in the back of his pick up truck. Producer, Ann Johnson, and her assistant Alicia Pitman, orchestrate some behind the scenes magic, collecting and sorting hundreds and hundreds of entry forms and rubber ducks. Dawn Mattingly acts as Set Designer by setting the stage for the big Finish Line Party.  The team of Promoters work hard to orchestrate as much fun as possible at the adoption events.  And finally, we have the mysterious person in a duck suit who visits various places in town for photo bombing opportunities. These are just a few of the many likable characters who rally around Quackerjack, an 8' inflatable rubber duck, who has taken on a life of his own. When this cast gets together, the laughs come easily, and the duck puns come even easier.

The plot, of course, is all driven by the big race at The Falls, to be held on September 7th at 2:00 p.m. Which local business will get its name on the winners' plaque? What number will be pulled from the 700 ducks floating that day?  Will it rain!?  These are all of the unanswered questions that have been building up all season long. Stay tuned for the finale!

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Curbside Convenience

At the library, we are always trying to update our services to meet the needs of our patrons. Not too long ago, one of our favorite patrons called because he wanted to purchase a statewide library card as a gift for his wife.  He was using an oxygen tank, and it was not easy for him to get out of the car and enter the library, and I said that I could meet him out in the parking lot.  We'd get it figured out.  And, we did.  It just took a little more effort, but it was totally worth it because a statewide library card is great gift idea, and I wanted to make it happen!

This got us thinking about several of our patrons who struggle to get out of their cars and enter the library to pick up a book or DVD.  So, we decided to launch curbside service to make their lives a little easier.  Patrons wishing to utilize curbside pickup may select "Curbside" as the pickup location when placing items on hold online.  In the notes field of the request, you may indicate your preferred pickup date and time.  For same day pickup, please call the library by 10:00 a.m.  Pickup services are available Monday and Wednesday, 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

When you arrive at the library to get your items, please park in the front lot, by the children’s patio and call 778-7527 to let us know you are here.  At that time, we will check out your items and walk them out to your car.  Please have your library card or ID ready when we hand you the items so we can verify the account.  And, that's all there is to it.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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The Magical Mystery of Interlibrary Loan

I worked at my local public library when I was in high school.  I did lots of things there, including shelving, basic reference, checking items in and out, and registering patrons.  One thing I didn't do though was interlibrary loan.  I filled out the form and dropped it in the back to Vivian who made the magic happen.

I had no idea what Vivian really did.  She was one of the few staff members who had a computer at her desk, and yet she spent a lot of time at the typewriter.  However she did it, Vivian was able to get pretty much any book you asked for.  They would come from all over the country, filling patron requests for titles so rare that they surely weren't held at the Rhinelander District Library.

Here in Pendleton, we do the same thing.  And honestly, it still blows my mind when our reference librarian, Christine Bellessis, gets books from all over the country.  The intricate network of borrowing and lending orchestrated over a computer database is a thing of beauty.  Or maybe I'm just a big library nerd.

Either way, the materials on our shelves merely scratch the surface of all that is available to you via interlibrary loan.  All you need to do is fill out a request form, and we'll handle the rest.  Don't be shy.  Give it a try, and let Chris do her magic!  

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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The Magical Mystery of Interlibrary Loan

I worked at my local public library when I was in high school.  I did lots of things there, including shelving, basic reference, checking items in and out, and registering patrons.  One thing I didn't do though was interlibrary loan.  I filled out the form and dropped it in the back to Vivian who made the magic happen.

I had no idea what Vivian really did.  She was one of the few staff members who had a computer at her desk, and yet she spent a lot of time at the typewriter.  However she did it, Vivian was able to get pretty much any book you asked for.  They would come from all over the country, filling patron requests for titles so rare that they surely weren't held at the Rhinelander District Library.

Here in Pendleton, we do the same thing.  And honestly, it still blows my mind when our reference librarian, Christine Bellessis, gets books from all over the country.  The intricate network of borrowing and lending orchestrated over a computer database is a thing of beauty.  Or maybe I'm just a big library nerd.

Either way, the materials on our shelves merely scratch the surface of all that is available to you via interlibrary loan.  All you need to do is fill out a request form, and we'll handle the rest.  Don't be shy.  Give it a try, and let Chris do her magic!  

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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The Magical Mystery of Interlibrary Loan

I worked at my local public library when I was in high school.  I did lots of things there, including shelving, basic reference, checking items in and out, and registering patrons.  One thing I didn't do though was interlibrary loan.  I filled out the form and dropped it in the back to Vivian who made the magic happen.

I had no idea what Vivian really did.  She was one of the few staff members who had a computer at her desk, and yet she spent a lot of time at the typewriter.  However she did it, Vivian was able to get pretty much any book you asked for.  They would come from all over the country, filling patron requests for titles so rare that they surely weren't held at the Rhinelander District Library.

Here in Pendleton, we do the same thing.  And honestly, it still blows my mind when our reference librarian, Christine Bellessis, gets books from all over the country.  The intricate network of borrowing and lending orchestrated over a computer database is a thing of beauty.  Or maybe I'm just a big library nerd.

Either way, the materials on our shelves merely scratch the surface of all that is available to you via interlibrary loan.  All you need to do is fill out a request form, and we'll handle the rest.  Don't be shy.  Give it a try, and let Chris do her magic!  

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Part of Our Story

May 27, 2019.  It is now a part of our story.  

I have no doubt that in a few years, the Pendleton Historical Museum will have space dedicated to the Memorial Day tornado.  Photos, news articles, artifacts, and documented tales of a community coming together will live among the war uniforms, Mary Aherns paintings, and school memorabilia. All of these pieces put together help us tell our story, the story of Pendleton, Indiana.

On the Wednesday after the storm, I headed to Falls Park to listen to the local press conference.  Walking through muddy tire treads, and carefully stepping over power lines and tree limbs, I made my way to the gazebo where I saw lots of familiar faces.  I asked after their families and homes.  Everybody had a story to share, their accounts of rattling garage doors, trembling children, and stubborn pets.  We will all remember May 27, 2019 and the days that follow.  Because it is now a part of our story.

At the library, we collect stories.  Lots of them. And on June 1st, we are kicking off our summer reading program with the theme, "A Universe of Stories."  At the library, you can find stories of adventure, romance, and triumph. You can find stories of treacherous journeys through fantastic lands and biographies of war veterans, movie stars, and politicians...all rich narratives of hard-fought victories, humbling defeats, and improbable heroism.  

The story of Pendleton, Indiana is still going, and I am certain that the best is yet to come. But, May 27, 2019 will remain a significant chapter.  It is now a part of our story.

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spreading the news

A few weeks ago, I was at a local salon for the first time.  The stylist asked me if I lived in Pendleton, and I told her that I worked at the library.  To that, she sheepishly responded, "Well, I can't say that I spend a lot of time there." I laughed and said that we didn't judge. But, I suggested that she stop in sometime to see what we offer these days.  I happened to mention that she could check out a free power washer from our Library of Things, and she was pretty surprised. 

When I went on to mention that virtual reality goggles, a metal detector, ukulele, and TV antenna were all available, she hollered over to another stylist, "Are you hearing this?" Before she could respond, the woman sitting in the other stylist's chair yelled back, "I'm sure hearing it, and I had no idea!"  And, just like that, I had slyly promoted the public library to three people, all while getting an eyebrow wax.

Sharing news about the good work of public libraries is a never-ending job.  There will always be somebody who just doesn't know what the modern library offers, and we'll take opportunities to let people know every chance we get. 

Last month we embraced National Library Week with our Friends of the Library.  The outpouring of support from our community was reaffirming. We always love the opportunity to share information about the importance of libraries, even with those who visit on a regular basis.  Whether you are a regular user or somebody who hasn't visited in a while, we invite you to stop in and take a look around.  Check out a ukulele while you're at it.

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Libraries = Strong Communities

This year's National Library Week theme is ​Libraries = Strong Communities. I like the idea, but I'm not sure that the equation is completely accurate. The very existence of a library facility within a community will not necessarily create a strong community. You need a strong library to create a strong community. And, you need a strong community in order to have a strong library. Because the library is about the people who use it. 


Say a patron visits the Pendleton Community Public Library for the first time because he needs a document notarized. He may happen upon the Library of Things and quickly find out that he can check out a free power washer. In talking with the library staff, he also learns that a mobile hotspot and telescope are free to check out. Perhaps he sees a new movie that he wants to watch. Maybe he picks up the latest newsletter and learns that the library offers free legal assistance programs and Saturday exercise classes. 
This individual may or may not become a regular user of the library, and that's okay. Of course, we'd love for him to be a steady patron, but at the very least, we'd like for him to be a steady supporter. By spreading the word about the public library and what it offers, others can learn about the services and resources available to them, right here in Pendleton. By connecting individuals to the specific resources they need, the library becomes a more valuable institution, fulfilling the unique needs of our community in a way that only the public library can. 


Libraries help people every day in any number of ways. Sure, we'll help you find a good book. But, we'll also help you find the right tax form. We'll answer your reference questions. We'll also help you with a crossword puzzle. We'll help you navigate a job search or proofread your resume. We'll give you a tour of the community garden and a packet of seeds to try at home. Even if you need a little help putting food on the table this month, we can help. 


Your public library is always here for you. But we need you to be here for us. Without patrons and supporters, the library is just a building. Buildings don't create strong communities. The people inside of them do.

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Bringing a little drama to your library

Bringing a little drama to your library
Last summer I was approached by two very kind women from Anderson about using our community room for drama classes for local students. I immediately saw this as a great chance to partner with their theatre group. That was when the Library Drama Camp was born. We were very excited to join forces with Spotlight on Drama to create a week-long intensive day camp for students. The kids would meet every day for a week to learn about theatre, acting, and public speaking. During that week they would also work on a short play. The week would culminate in a presentation of the play for their families. We gave it a go last July, and it was a big success. It was only natural to want to do it again. So your library partnered with Spotlight on Drama once again this spring break. Last week we had our second drama camp, and the students performed the classic tale Stone Soup. I am extremely impressed that a group of 7-13 year old kids can learn all of their lines and perform a play after only 4 days. This time the play included a short musical number as well which was a new experience for many of the students. This group of kids not only performed the play, but they were stars!
If you would like to see their performance, you can find it at the link below. Due to the amazing success of these camps, we are pleased to announce that we will offer another Drama Camp during the week of July 22nd. If you have a student who is in 1st-6th grade who would like to perform, keep an eye on our calendar, newsletter, and social media for announcements.

https://youtu.be/QEphIlm6VfI
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Back to Basics

When we were working on the library’s long-range plan, we wanted to strike a balance between trying the next best thing and sticking to our roots, which will always be books and reading.  Even with free wi-fi, great programs, and notary services, most people still visit the library to find a good book or a stack of them.  We love all of our reading patrons, and we want to support you by staying true to our brand.

One of the goals on the library’s long-range plan is to “Provide greater services and support to readers.”  We plan to do this in a number of different ways. 

First, we are always building upon our website, and we have added a new resource, Books and Authors to the “For Readers” page of our website.  On that page, you can also find new book lists and links to other online resources for voracious readers.

Second, we are creating thematic bookmarks for you to use as suggested reading lists.  We are tapping into the expertise of our entire staff to cultivate reading lists for things like modern fairy tales, historic fiction, and even funny stories to read together with your children.  We want to make finding your next great read easy and maybe even a little surprising.

And finally, we hope to interact with you personally as your Reader’s Advisor.  Think of a librarian as your literary concierge.  We want you to tell us about some of your favorite books so that we may use our mad librarian skills to suggest something else we think you will enjoy.  Stop in and tell us what you’re reading so we can suggest what to read next. 

Lynn Hobbs, Library Director

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The Talents That Surround Us

A couple of years ago, I was at the South Madison Community Foundation's Open Hearts, Open Purses event. I was perusing the silent auction baskets, and was particularly interested in the one that offered a classically-trained chef who will come to your house and cook a gourmet Cajun meal for eight. What really struck me was that the Cajun chef was the Foundation's own Lisa Floyd!

Fast forward to last year when the South Madison Community Foundation awarded $7,000 to the library for a learning kitchen. The kitchen is to be used for cooking classes and demonstrations. You can probably see where this is headed.

On Saturday, February 23rd at 1:00 p.m., Lisa Floyd will be featured in The Learning Kitchen as she prepares jambalaya and bread pudding. Those who attend will be taught the secrets of gourmet Cajun cooking from one of Pendleton's premier movers and shakers!

At the library, we took this idea a step farther. We recognize that there are lots of talented people in our area. Quilters, woodworkers, birders, knitters, weavers, artists, writers, plumbers, musicians...the list goes on and on. And, these are the individuals who create the fabric of our community. So, doesn't it make perfect sense for the library to tap into all of these talents as a way to help you discover your next passion?

One of the goals on the library's long-range plan is to "focus adult programming on lifelong learning, skills development, and civility." One of the ways we hope to do that is to find local community members who are willing to share their skills and talents with others. If you've got a talent to share, please let us know by emailing ckase@pendleton.lib.in.us.

If you are interested in reading the library's entire long-range plan for 2019-2021, it is available on our website.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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pop-up wildlife

It's funny how things just evolve.  For example, take the library's little nature preserve, visible from the public computer area.  When the new library was built, nearly twelve years ago, that space was professionally landscaped with shrubs and trees.  After some time, a couple of the shrubs died and had to be removed.  The space was looking pretty bare, so library staff members purchased a couple of bird feeders to hang from the trees to attract birds in the winter.  Our children's librarian purchased a hummingbird feeder and started making monthly batches of hummingbird nectar in the break room.

After a few seasons, the lawn started to deteriorate and the grass gave way to clover, attracting rabbits.  The Friends of the Library bought a bird bath to place near the feeders.  Soon, the Pendleton Garden Club took interest in the area and obtained a grant to introduce native plants to the library's landscape. Now there is a pollinator garden that includes plants like Cardinal Flowers, Golden Alexanders, and Wild Bee Balm. Scott Andersen, from Seedy Sally's, took note of this charming little outdoor space, and donated a lovely new bird feeder that looks like a birch tree.  Before we knew it, what started out as basic, run-of-the-mill commercial landscaping became a nice, little wildlife refuge where you can spot birds of all kinds, rabbits, stray cats, and even the occasional fox. 

It wasn't our intention to create this space.  It just kinda happened.  The bunnies hopped over, and the birds settled in.  Staff gave the rabbits and squirrels names like Sweet Pea and Mayor McSquirrel.  They live in the microcosm of local flora and fauna that we can all enjoy, year-round.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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introducing tutor.com

When I was in school, my mom was the the editor for the local newspaper. This came in pretty handy when I needed a proofreader for term papers. She always had a keen eye for typos, but she also helped me with sentence structure, organization, and overall flow.
She would go over my work with a fine tooth comb, and with every correction, I would get more and more frustrated with her high standards. It didn't have to be THAT good, did it? Plus, it was past
 my bedtime.

As helpful as she was with my writing, she couldn't help with all of my schoolwork. She couldn't help with algebra. She couldn't help with chemistry. She couldn't even help with French because she speaks fluent Italian instead! There were times I struggled with these subjects, and I could have used a tutor.

At the library we recognize that there will always be students who need a little extra help with their schoolwork. We want to help. Carter Logistics awarded a $2,000 grant to help pay for a subscription to tutor.com. Tutor.com provides students with access to a live tutor who can help with problems in math, science, foreign language, and more. There are additional resources for college students and those who are college-bound. Job seekers can even submit a resume or cover letter for review.

Find tutor.com on the library's website, beginning in January. It can be accessed from any device, at any location, with your Pendleton Community Public Library card. Many resources are available 24/7, but live tutors are available Monday - Friday from 3 - 10 p.m. and Saturday - Sunday from noon - 7:00 p.m.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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one-on-one tech help

The year I got a Merlin for Christmas was the same year that I was selected to place the Baby Jesus in the manger at midnight mass. The priest had briefed me the day before on what to do.  He reminded me of what an important job I had, and so I practiced walking down our hallway with a half-gallon of milk cradled in my arms.  I was completely prepared.  

What I was not prepared for was my distraction.  From the priest's instructions the day before, I knew that I was supposed to appear angelic, and that I was supposed to be thinking about Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. Better yet if I was even praying silently to myself as I walked the tiny statue to the altar.  But, when the time came, all I could think about was my brand new Merlin which I had just unwrapped a mere hour before.  I was consumed with thoughts of its ten buttons and the hours of gameplay they would afford. Tic-Tac-Toe, Magic Square, Crack the Code...  That's what I was thinking about as I walked the Baby Jesus down the aisle. 

The bottom line is that gadgets are fun.  It's exciting to unwrap a new Kindle or iPad. But, if your new toy is a little unfamiliar, the Pendleton Community Public Library can help!  With the library's Book-A-Librarian service, we can teach you how to use all of your new toys.  Call 778-7527 to book a 30-minute one-on-one session where a librarian will help you use your new device.  And, if you happen to have a Merlin, ask for me.  I think I still remember how to crack the code.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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cutting the cable cord

Consumer Reports ran a recent article about cutting the cable cord. This is something many of us want to do, but when we try to break down this à la carte approach to cable service, it can be daunting. We want to save money while having access to local network programming as well as our favorite TV shows and premium channels. So, that means it's time to do my research.

I read this article...twice. I got online and priced out my preferred Sling package. I looked at antennas at a big box store. I double checked what's already available on my Apple TV. I looked at Hulu and Netflix. I talked with friends about their Amazon Fire TV stick and Prime services. And in the end, I still have cable. Cutting the cord is hard. Time is money. And, I've already spent a bunch of time trying to save money.

Even though I haven't cut the cord yet, I have to give kudos to Consumer Reports for their excellent, easy-to-understand coverage of a confusing topic. The following month, I was pleased to see letters to the editor raving about the completeness of the options presented. Of course, some readers pointed out a few lesser-known options, and one reader in particular, pointed out a piece of the puzzle that even I, the local Library Director, didn't even consider.

The letter reads, in part, "For movies and TV shows, I get DVDs from the library!" Huh. Who knew?? Well, surely I did, but I didn't even consider the library as a part of my approach to cutting the cable. And, if it didn't cross my mind, as somebody who lives and breathes the public library...chances are it didn't cross yours either. Don't forget your public library as you develop your strategy for cutting the cable cord. Chances are your favorite TV shows and movies are available to you at no charge, and commercial-free!

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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A note from an appreciative mom about Hoopla

A message was received from a local mom to share her Hoopla experience, we wanted to take this opportunity to share it with everyone:

I want to thank my library for introducing me to Hoopla. I had been a user of this service since you began offering it a few years ago to listen to audiobooks while running errands and doing housework. Recently I have discovered the value it has for my kids as well. My daughter was having what I would call a "readers block". She had lost her enthusiasm for reading and it really concerned me. Then we noticed that she wasn't completing her SRC reading quizzes at school as a result. As with many families, we have a very busy schedule. We're always running off to sports, programs, parties, etc. So I began to think about this time we were "wasting" in the car. Since my daughter gets carsick, reading in the car wasn't an option for her, and she was so exhausted by bedtime that she would fall asleep reading. One afternoon she noticed that I was browsing through my Hoopla app trying to select my next book to listen to. This piqued her interest! So we browsed the children's titles together, and WOW there are a lot. She settled on one of the I Survived titles in the popular series. Since we drive to Fishers twice a week for practice, I thought this would be a perfect time to start listening. As we cruised down I-69 listening to I Survived Hurricane Katrina, I noticed that she was very engaged with the book (honestly, so was I). We were able to finish that title in one evening. It also sparked some great conversations between the two of us about my memories of the hurricane. The next time we had to head to Fishers, she asked if we could pick another book. So we settled on I Survived September 11, 2001. Again, she was engaged and we were able to have some great conversations about this historical event. Her next title was a Lemony Snicket book, with an amazing narrator. Another win for us! Since beginning to listen to books, I've noticed her more excited to pick up her books and read too. Now that she's found titles she has liked on audio, it has inspired her to read more in those series.

Another side note that I love about Hoopla is that I can download the titles onto my phone. That way I'm not using up all my data as we drive down the highway. We also download picture books to use as bedtime stories on a recent vacation, so we didn't have to pack numerous books to keep our bedtime routine.
Thank you so much for this service and so many others!
Sincerely,
An Appreciative Mom

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Digital Magazines

When most people board a plane, they have a plan for how they will spend the time in the air. Teens wait in line with travel pillows around their necks, waiting to get into their seats so that they can snooze for a few hours.  Business people carry on laptops, intending to finish up presentations. Some people have a book or magazine that they plan to read, and yet others have shows or movies to watch.  Me?  I stare at the seat in front of me. 

In all honesty, I have a hard time reading or watching movies on a plane.  I just cannot focus to the point where I am losing myself in the story.  I am always fully aware that I am on a plane, and that the flight attendant may stop by at any moment with peanuts and ginger ale.  I'm just too distracted.  However, I do enjoy reading magazines because they don't require a lot of focus.  You can flip through the glossy pages pretty quickly and pick and choose what appeals to you.  But, I don't want to spend $5.00 on a 20 minute read!  So instead, I stare at the seat in front of me.

Well, now your library has FREE digital magazines, available from Libby by OverDrive. Download the Libby app, and select the Pendleton Community Public Library as your home library.  Enter your library card number and start borrowing magazines like HGTV Magazine, Cosmopolitan, and ESPN The Magazine.  There is no limit to how many you can check out, and there is no waiting period, even for the most popular titles.  Now you can have a collection of magazines to enjoy on a plane, at the beach, or even just sitting on your couch.

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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Bike Share

Recently, I was downtown Indianapolis for a meeting at the Indiana State Library. It was about two weeks after Bird scooters were introduced to the city. And let me tell you. They were popular! There was at least one on every block, a person riding an electric scooter amidst the throngs of people on the sidewalk. I could tell that some pedestrians were annoyed with the new trend, but I actually thought it was pretty cool.

Bird scooters are motorized scooters that you rent through an app on your phone. Similar to the city’s Blue Indy car rental, they provide a means of transportation for people who don’t need to own their own vehicles, but have an occasional need for wheels. It seems so progressive, so urban. I like it.

So, I was pretty thrilled when I got a call from Rachel Christenson from the Town of Pendleton, asking me if the library would be interested in becoming a location for the town’s new Bike Share. The Bike Share is sponsored by Community Hospitals and allows people to rent bicycles. You could rent one to ride along the trails in the park. Or ride one downtown and browse the local shops, with no worries about finding a parking place. It’s progressive, not urban. I still like it.

Look for the new Bike Share locations at your Pendleton Community Public Library, Falls Park, and behind First Merchants. Coming Soon!

Lynn Hobbs
PCL Director

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